Access your Drive files with Google File Stream

With Google Drive File Stream, you can access all all of your Google My Drive and Team Drive files directly from your computer without having to open a browser. You can also select files to make available for offline use for when you don’t have an internet connection.

When you install Drive File Stream on your computer, it creates a drive in Windows Explorer named Google Drive File Stream. All of your My Drive and Team Drive files will appear there. You can transfer files between your computer and Drive or browse and organize your Drive files right in Windows Explorer.



The File Stream app also allows you to open files directly within applications like Microsoft Word. When you click File > Open, just browse to the Google File Stream Drive to locate your file.

If you used the old Google Drive Desktop App, you may have received a notification that it would no longer work after May 12, 2018. Google File Stream is a recommended replacement for the Google Drive Desktop App. Another option …

New Web Resource: Accessible U

screenshot: accessibility.umn.edu


Check out the completely redesigned digital accessibility website, Accessible U! 

http://accessibility.umn.edu/

When I first clicked on this new site in my email, I have to admit I was expecting pages of policies and cautions and lots of scolding. SNORE!

But trust me on this, you will love this resource! It is a concise treasure trove of practical resources. It was developed for and by members of the University of Minnesota community (including our very own Alison Holland!).

Why Accessibility?

As the designers, creators, and implementers of technology, we can positively or negatively impact the ability of individuals to access and use what we create. Why put up unnecessary barriers, when they are easy to remove? Also, increased accessibility helps everyone use our digital materials better! Who hasn't used closed captioning? Or struggled to see low-contrast text?

Core Skills

The site is based around SIX CORE SKILLS of accessibility. These rules come in handy for Google docs, web pages, presentations, Moodle courses, videos, all kinds of things Extension does every day. And in fact, there are pages on the site for each of those things! But first, the six skills.

The six core skills of accessibility:

  1. Headings and document structure
  2. Hyperlinks
  3. Bullets and numbered lists
  4. Video captions
  5. Color and contrast
  6. Alternative text for images

These skills will improve your communications for everyone who reads them. Check out the site and let us know what you found interesting by leaving a comment! I personally have gotten a bit lazy with accessibility and found the Advocacy page to be just the re-motivation I needed!

Comments

  1. I found the "Who benefits from captioning and/or transcripts?" section interesting - there are so many situations in which captions are helpful! http://accessibility.umn.edu/core-skills/video-captions-transcripts#Who%20benefits%20from%20captioning%20and/or%20transcripts?

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