Access your Drive files with Google File Stream

With Google Drive File Stream, you can access all all of your Google My Drive and Team Drive files directly from your computer without having to open a browser. You can also select files to make available for offline use for when you don’t have an internet connection.

When you install Drive File Stream on your computer, it creates a drive in Windows Explorer named Google Drive File Stream. All of your My Drive and Team Drive files will appear there. You can transfer files between your computer and Drive or browse and organize your Drive files right in Windows Explorer.



The File Stream app also allows you to open files directly within applications like Microsoft Word. When you click File > Open, just browse to the Google File Stream Drive to locate your file.

If you used the old Google Drive Desktop App, you may have received a notification that it would no longer work after May 12, 2018. Google File Stream is a recommended replacement for the Google Drive Desktop App. Another option …

25 Years of ADA: Practical e-learning readability and accessibility tips

ADA 25 Logo

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) will turn twenty-five on July 26, 2015.


We're celebrating by sharing a guide to making e-learning materials accessible to all learners.  

If you're anything like me, you want to get it "right."  But that can make you freeze in your tracks.  I'm using the #ADA25 celebration as a reason to create a deadline for myself -- a reason to hit publish and share a guide that will hopefully help you make your education and outreach materials more accessible.

Is it perfect?  Probably not.  But is it helping anyone if I don't share it?  No.

I hope you'll use this guide the next time you create e-learning materials -- but I also hope the fear of not getting it "right" doesn't stop you from trying one or two things to make your materials more accessible and sharing your work.

There are a lot of things to think of, so we've simplified it a bit with a checklist:
  1. Choose a document format
  2. Choose fonts wisely
  3. Consider colors
  4. Use structured headings
  5. Add alt-text for images
  6. Check reading level
  7. Check overall accessibility

Learn more: Readability and Accessibility: A guide to making e-learning materials accessible to all learners

How will you celebrate #ADA25?

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